Sacred and Profane

Neapolitans’ devotion to the saints and to the ancient traditions linked to the superstition and cults of the dead is famous throughout the world. Walking through the “city of five hundred domes” (this is how Naples was defined, because of the number of its churches) you can appreciate these two aspects.
San Francesco di Paola
It frames the huge Piazza del Plebiscito with the majestic and famous colonnade, evoking the neoclassical Pantheon of Rome both on the façade and inside. The imposing 19th century church, with the tympanum on Ionic columns, the three tall domes and the circular plan, is by its importance one of the most loved and visited places in the city. The church is surmounted by three domes: the central one, 53 meters high, was built on a high and wide drum.
Church of the Gesù Nuovo
The monumental church is characterized by a façade with a diamond-shaped piperno stone, one of the rare cases in Italy, and the rich interior furnishings that represent one of the most valuable examples of Neapolitan Baroque. A peculiarity of the church regards the presence of a miraculously unexploded bomb of the Second World War, which is today exposed to the public.
Church and Cloister of Santa Chiara
In the suggestive Spaccanapoli street, there is the Complex of Santa Chiara, which represents a must-see stop in the city, along with the Basilica, the four monumental cloisters, the Archaeological Excavations and the Museum of the Opera with part of Giotto’s frescoes. The famous Cloister Maiolicato delle Clarisse with its marvellous 18th century majolica, baroque frescoes, and interior architecture, is one of the most precious hidden treasures of the city.
The Cathedral of Naples
The Cathedral of Naples is a veritable monumental masterpiece to be discovered. Seat of the rite of the dissolution of the blood of San Gennaro, it stands out on via Duomo with its very high neo-gothic façade, about 50 meters high. The rich and sumptuous interior sees different styles coexist, dominated by the Baroque, and presents masterpieces by great artists. From the right aisle of the Cathedral, it is possible to access the Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro which guards the blood of the Patron Saint of Naples and is a jewel of art and world architecture.
Church and Charterhouse of San Martino
Moving from the old town centre, the monumental complex, located on the top of the panoramic Vomero hill, is one of the most beautiful places in Naples; it was built in 1325 by Charles of Anjou who wanted it in a dominant position. The church is among the best examples of Baroque art and architecture and has about a hundred rooms, two churches, a courtyard, four chapels, three cloisters and hanging gardens. Chronologically it is the second Carthusian monastery in Campania, having been built nineteen years after that of San Lorenzo in Padula and forty-six years before that of San Giacomo in Capri.
San-Domenico-Maggiore
Complex of San Domenico Maggiore
The Church, with the homonymous religious complex, is one of the largest in Naples considered the whole of the Basilica and Convent. It was built by Charles of Anjou in 1283 and deserves a visit not only for its monumental beauty. Of Gothic layout with Baroque interventions it has hosted and houses important works of art: it was, for example, the original seat of the “Flagellation of Christ” by Caravaggio, which resides today in the Museum of Capodimonte.
Fontanelle Cemetery
The Fontanelle Cemetery is a unique site in the world, a former ossuary that extends for more than 3000 square meters and it contains the remains of an unknown number of people. It is located in Rione Sanità, one of the richest neighbourhoods in the history and tradition of Naples. The cemetery is well known because the ritual of the “pezzentelle souls” took place here: Neapolitan worshippers used to adopt and preserve skulls of abandoned souls as a symbol of devotion towards the souls of Purgatory. Every corner, every corridor of the Fontanelle Cemetery is rich in history, anecdotes, legends and curiosities just waiting to be heard.
Catacombs of San Gennaro
They are ancient underground cemetery areas dating back to the 1st-2nd century and represent the most important monument of Christianity in Naples. The entrance to the catacombs is currently located near the Church of the Incoronata in Capodimonte and together with the Sacred Mile it is a surprising walk through time, on the first burial ground of San Gennaro to discover stories, architecture and frescoes. Cross the hill in tuff and the visit ends in the ancient Rione Sanità, today redeveloped thanks to the intervention of young residents of the neighbourhood, who since 2006 have strongly wanted this tourist and cultural itinerary.
Sacred and Profane
Neapolitans’ devotion to the saints and to the ancient traditions linked to the superstition and cults of the dead is famous throughout the world. Walking through the “city of five hundred domes” (this is how Naples was defined, because of the number of its churches) you can appreciate these two aspects.
San Francesco di Paola
It frames the huge Piazza del Plebiscito with the majestic and famous colonnade, evoking the neoclassical Pantheon of Rome both on the façade and inside. The imposing 19th century church, with the tympanum on Ionic columns, the three tall domes and the circular plan, is by its importance one of the most loved and visited places in the city. The church is surmounted by three domes: the central one, 53 meters high, was built on a high and wide drum.
Church of the Gesù Nuovo
The monumental church is characterized by a façade with a diamond-shaped piperno stone, one of the rare cases in Italy, and the rich interior furnishings that represent one of the most valuable examples of Neapolitan Baroque. A peculiarity of the church regards the presence of a miraculously unexploded bomb of the Second World War, which is today exposed to the public.
Church and Cloister of Santa Chiara
In the suggestive Spaccanapoli street, there is the Complex of Santa Chiara, which represents a must-see stop in the city, along with the Basilica, the four monumental cloisters, the Archaeological Excavations and the Museum of the Opera with part of Giotto’s frescoes. The famous Cloister Maiolicato delle Clarisse with its marvellous 18th century majolica, baroque frescoes, and interior architecture, is one of the most precious hidden treasures of the city.
The Cathedral of Naples
The Cathedral of Naples is a veritable monumental masterpiece to be discovered. Seat of the rite of the dissolution of the blood of San Gennaro, it stands out on via Duomo with its very high neo-gothic façade, about 50 meters high. The rich and sumptuous interior sees different styles coexist, dominated by the Baroque, and presents masterpieces by great artists. From the right aisle of the Cathedral, it is possible to access the Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro which guards the blood of the Patron Saint of Naples and is a jewel of art and world architecture.
Church and Charterhouse of San Martino
Moving from the old town centre, the monumental complex, located on the top of the panoramic Vomero hill, is one of the most beautiful places in Naples; it was built in 1325 by Charles of Anjou who wanted it in a dominant position. The church is among the best examples of Baroque art and architecture and has about a hundred rooms, two churches, a courtyard, four chapels, three cloisters and hanging gardens. Chronologically it is the second Carthusian monastery in Campania, having been built nineteen years after that of San Lorenzo in Padula and forty-six years before that of San Giacomo in Capri.
Complex of San Domenico Maggiore
The Church, with the homonymous religious complex, is one of the largest in Naples considered the whole of the Basilica and Convent. It was built by Charles of Anjou in 1283 and deserves a visit not only for its monumental beauty. Of Gothic layout with Baroque interventions it has hosted and houses important works of art: it was, for example, the original seat of the “Flagellation of Christ” by Caravaggio, which resides today in the Museum of Capodimonte.
Fontanelle Cemetery
The Fontanelle Cemetery is a unique site in the world, a former ossuary that extends for more than 3000 square meters and it contains the remains of an unknown number of people. It is located in Rione Sanità, one of the richest neighbourhoods in the history and tradition of Naples. The cemetery is well known because the ritual of the “pezzentelle souls” took place here: Neapolitan worshippers used to adopt and preserve skulls of abandoned souls as a symbol of devotion towards the souls of Purgatory. Every corner, every corridor of the Fontanelle Cemetery is rich in history, anecdotes, legends and curiosities just waiting to be heard.
Catacombs of San Gennaro
They are ancient underground cemetery areas dating back to the 1st-2nd century and represent the most important monument of Christianity in Naples. The entrance to the catacombs is currently located near the Church of the Incoronata in Capodimonte and together with the Sacred Mile it is a surprising walk through time, on the first burial ground of San Gennaro to discover stories, architecture and frescoes. Cross the hill in tuff and the visit ends in the ancient Rione Sanità, today redeveloped thanks to the intervention of young residents of the neighbourhood, who since 2006 have strongly wanted this tourist and cultural itinerary.
Sacred and Profane
Neapolitans’ devotion to the saints and to the ancient traditions linked to the superstition and cults of the dead is famous throughout the world. Walking through the “city of five hundred domes” (this is how Naples was defined, because of the number of its churches) you can appreciate these two aspects.
San Francesco di Paola
It frames the huge Piazza del Plebiscito with the majestic and famous colonnade, evoking the neoclassical Pantheon of Rome both on the façade and inside. The imposing 19th century church, with the tympanum on Ionic columns, the three tall domes and the circular plan, is by its importance one of the most loved and visited places in the city. The church is surmounted by three domes: the central one, 53 meters high, was built on a high and wide drum.
Church of the Gesù Nuovo
The monumental church is characterized by a façade with a diamond-shaped piperno stone, one of the rare cases in Italy, and the rich interior furnishings that represent one of the most valuable examples of Neapolitan Baroque. A peculiarity of the church regards the presence of a miraculously unexploded bomb of the Second World War, which is today exposed to the public.
Church and Cloister of Santa Chiara
In the suggestive Spaccanapoli street, there is the Complex of Santa Chiara, which represents a must-see stop in the city, along with the Basilica, the four monumental cloisters, the Archaeological Excavations and the Museum of the Opera with part of Giotto’s frescoes. The famous Cloister Maiolicato delle Clarisse with its marvellous 18th century majolica, baroque frescoes, and interior architecture, is one of the most precious hidden treasures of the city.
The Cathedral of Naples
The Cathedral of Naples is a veritable monumental masterpiece to be discovered. Seat of the rite of the dissolution of the blood of San Gennaro, it stands out on via Duomo with its very high neo-gothic façade, about 50 meters high. The rich and sumptuous interior sees different styles coexist, dominated by the Baroque, and presents masterpieces by great artists. From the right aisle of the Cathedral, it is possible to access the Chapel of the Treasure of San Gennaro which guards the blood of the Patron Saint of Naples and is a jewel of art and world architecture.
Church and Charterhouse of San Martino
Moving from the old town centre, the monumental complex, located on the top of the panoramic Vomero hill, is one of the most beautiful places in Naples; it was built in 1325 by Charles of Anjou who wanted it in a dominant position. The church is among the best examples of Baroque art and architecture and has about a hundred rooms, two churches, a courtyard, four chapels, three cloisters and hanging gardens. Chronologically it is the second Carthusian monastery in Campania, having been built nineteen years after that of San Lorenzo in Padula and forty-six years before that of San Giacomo in Capri.
Complex of San Domenico Maggiore
The Church, with the homonymous religious complex, is one of the largest in Naples considered the whole of the Basilica and Convent. It was built by Charles of Anjou in 1283 and deserves a visit not only for its monumental beauty. Of Gothic layout with Baroque interventions it has hosted and houses important works of art: it was, for example, the original seat of the “Flagellation of Christ” by Caravaggio, which resides today in the Museum of Capodimonte.
Fontanelle Cemetery
The Fontanelle Cemetery is a unique site in the world, a former ossuary that extends for more than 3000 square meters and it contains the remains of an unknown number of people. It is located in Rione Sanità, one of the richest neighbourhoods in the history and tradition of Naples. The cemetery is well known because the ritual of the “pezzentelle souls” took place here: Neapolitan worshippers used to adopt and preserve skulls of abandoned souls as a symbol of devotion towards the souls of Purgatory. Every corner, every corridor of the Fontanelle Cemetery is rich in history, anecdotes, legends and curiosities just waiting to be heard.
Catacombs of San Gennaro
They are ancient underground cemetery areas dating back to the 1st-2nd century and represent the most important monument of Christianity in Naples. The entrance to the catacombs is currently located near the Church of the Incoronata in Capodimonte and together with the Sacred Mile it is a surprising walk through time, on the first burial ground of San Gennaro to discover stories, architecture and frescoes. Cross the hill in tuff and the visit ends in the ancient Rione Sanità, today redeveloped thanks to the intervention of young residents of the neighbourhood, who since 2006 have strongly wanted this tourist and cultural itinerary.